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This is important, because some of the club colours change around this time, meaning that some of the earlier colours were produced in the new figure for a very short time.

The inherited kits were mainly standard footballing colours used by teams the world over.

See "Frog Went A-Courting" at Wikisource for one version of the lyrics. 524–532) constitute probably the best succinct summary available on variants of this piece.

Usually, the final verse states that there's a piece of food on the shelf, and that if the listener wants to hear more verses, they have to sing it themselves. Spaeth has a note claiming that the original version of this was supposed to refer to François, Duke of Anjou's wooing of Elizabeth I of England, however, this was in 1579 and the original Scottish version was already published.

Its first known appearance is in Wedderburn's Complaynt of Scotland (1548) under the name "The Frog cam to the Myl dur", though this is in Scots rather than English.

There is a reference in the London Company of Stationers' Register of 1580 to "A Moste Strange Weddinge of the Frogge and the Mouse." There are many texts of the ballad; however the oldest known musical version is in Thomas Ravenscroft's Melismata in 1611. She is willing but must ask permission of Uncle Rat.

However, this did not stop Subbuteo from selling them, and they continued to turn up throughout the 1970s. The first batch increased the teams from 81 to 106.

Uncle Rat's permission received, the two work out details of the wedding.

According to Albert Jack in his book "Pop Goes the Weasel, The Secret Meanings of Nursery Rhymes" (pp.

33–37, copyright 2008), the earliest known version of the song was published in 1549 as "The Frog Came to the Myl Dur" in Robert Wedderburn's "Complaynt of Scotland".

Another theory traces the song to Suffolk: "Roley, Poley, Gammon and Spinach" refer to four families of Suffolk notables, Rowley, Poley, Bacon and Green.

The song has been heard by many people (as "Froggie Went A-Courtin'") in the 1955 Tom and Jerry cartoon Pecos Pest, which uses a version arranged and performed by Shug Fisher, in character as "Uncle Pecos." In Pecos Pest, Jerry's Uncle Pecos stays with him while getting ready for a television appearance, and continues to pluck Tom's whiskers to use as guitar strings throughout the cartoon.

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